Central European literary life

Main blog at literalab.com

Twitter - @literalab

 

Literary roundup: Readux Series 2 launch, Marian Schwartz
On the latest Anna Karenina, difficult Russian translations, the next Russian work that will be in B O D Y and a vodka and Green Egg and Ham-fueled book launch in Berlin.
Read more at Literalab

Literary roundup: Readux Series 2 launch, Marian Schwartz

On the latest Anna Karenina, difficult Russian translations, the next Russian work that will be in B O D Y and a vodka and Green Egg and Ham-fueled book launch in Berlin.

Read more at Literalab

Literary roundup: 1960s Soviet Union finally opening up
On the Russian Secret Service’s release of the manuscript + typescript of Vasily Grossman’s (pictured) epic novel Life and Fate as well as a translator’s explanation of changing a book’s title and a Dostoevsky walk through St. Petersburg with a William T. Vollmann anecdote from my own Dostoevsky walk.
Continue Reading

Literary roundup: 1960s Soviet Union finally opening up

On the Russian Secret Service’s release of the manuscript + typescript of Vasily Grossman’s (pictured) epic novel Life and Fate as well as a translator’s explanation of changing a book’s title and a Dostoevsky walk through St. Petersburg with a William T. Vollmann anecdote from my own Dostoevsky walk.

Continue Reading

Dmitri Novoselov in B O D Y
Alevtina” is a short story by Dmitri Novoselov, translated by Will Firth, recounting a woman’s odyssey through different husbands, lovers and wild turns of fortune whose chaos is highly suggestive of the post-Soviet Russia during which her adult life has played out.
Read “Alvetina" in B O D Y’s Sunday European Fiction

Dmitri Novoselov in B O D Y

Alevtina” is a short story by Dmitri Novoselov, translated by Will Firth, recounting a woman’s odyssey through different husbands, lovers and wild turns of fortune whose chaos is highly suggestive of the post-Soviet Russia during which her adult life has played out.

Read “Alvetina" in B O D Y’s Sunday European Fiction

Teffi in B O D Y
"Merangov interspersed his stories with various local words and expressions, which made them very colorful, although for us who did not know those barbarian languages they all sounded alike, something like ‘be-me-ne’ or ‘El-Dzhaman’."
From a story by Nadezhda Lokhvitskaya, who wrote under the name Teffi, first in St. Petersburg and after the 1919 Revolution in Paris.
Read the story in B O D Y’s Sunday European Fiction
Photo - Teffi in World War I

Teffi in B O D Y

"Merangov interspersed his stories with various local words and expressions, which made them very colorful, although for us who did not know those barbarian languages they all sounded alike, something like ‘be-me-ne’ or ‘El-Dzhaman’."

From a story by Nadezhda Lokhvitskaya, who wrote under the name Teffi, first in St. Petersburg and after the 1919 Revolution in Paris.

Read the story in B O D Y’s Sunday European Fiction

Photo - Teffi in World War I

Irina Bogatyreva in B O D Y
“Hi, Julia, skinhead girl with a twisted smile, given to mild swearing. You saunter out, look your public over with that sneer of yours, hands in your pockets, clenched in tight fists. There’s just you and an audience, Julia, and who’s to say they are all on your side? You smirk, put on that husky voice, close your eyes in the spotlight, strike that guitar and sing about getting drunk on Saturday nights.”
From the excerpted chapter “New Spring” in Irina Bogatyreva’s debut novel Off the Beaten Tracks in this weeks Sunday European Fiction.
Photo - Irina Bogatyreva courtesy of Glas: New Russian Writing

Irina Bogatyreva in B O D Y

Hi, Julia, skinhead girl with a twisted smile, given to mild swearing. You saunter out, look your public over with that sneer of yours, hands in your pockets, clenched in tight fists. There’s just you and an audience, Julia, and who’s to say they are all on your side? You smirk, put on that husky voice, close your eyes in the spotlight, strike that guitar and sing about getting drunk on Saturday nights.”

From the excerpted chapter “New Spring” in Irina Bogatyreva’s debut novel Off the Beaten Tracks in this weeks Sunday European Fiction.

Photo - Irina Bogatyreva courtesy of Glas: New Russian Writing

Literary roundup: Russian literature’s new generation in New York and at B O D Y
Including a link to a great story by Antal Szerb.
Continue reading
 
Photo - Natasha Rostova in the Cozy Classics version of War and Peace

Literary roundup: Russian literature’s new generation in New York and at B O D Y

Including a link to a great story by Antal Szerb.

Continue reading

 

Photo - Natasha Rostova in the Cozy Classics version of War and Peace

Literary roundup: Russian heavyweights and a Bulgarian brand

On the use and misuse of the term literary heavyweight, two Russian novelists and the foundation giving Bulgarian writing some international attention.

Continue Reading

Photos - Mikhail Shishkin, Dmitry Bykov

Literary roundup: CE Forum, Vladimir Makinin and ©

On the Central European Forum in Bratislava and the European Prize for Literature winner Vladimir Makinin

Continue Reading

Photos - Forum guests Zygmunt Bauman, Gyorgy Konrad, and two photos (Golem, pameti noci) by Peter Župník

Literary Roundup: Russian horses, new writers and bodies from Prague
On Chtenia’s Summer 2012 all horses Russian lit issue, a story from the young “Queen of Russian Horror” and Prague literary mag B O D Y
Continue Reading
Photo - Two Horses Red and Blue by Franz Marc, 1912 (I know he isn’t Russian but I like the painting, so . . )

Literary Roundup: Russian horses, new writers and bodies from Prague

On Chtenia’s Summer 2012 all horses Russian lit issue, a story from the young “Queen of Russian Horror” and Prague literary mag B O D Y

Continue Reading

Photo - Two Horses Red and Blue by Franz Marc, 1912 (I know he isn’t Russian but I like the painting, so . . )

Russian writer and journalist Vlas Doroshevich is not the only writer of parablelike stories exploring issues of justice and power who died in the 1920’s and whose work seems to illuminate the much darker period of history that followed his death, when the liquid that smoothed the grinding wheels of bureaucracy was revealed to be blood.
A review of What the Emperor Cannot Do: Tales and Legends of the Orient by Vlas Doroshevich

Russian writer and journalist Vlas Doroshevich is not the only writer of parablelike stories exploring issues of justice and power who died in the 1920’s and whose work seems to illuminate the much darker period of history that followed his death, when the liquid that smoothed the grinding wheels of bureaucracy was revealed to be blood.

A review of What the Emperor Cannot Do: Tales and Legends of the Orient by Vlas Doroshevich