Central European literary life

Main blog at literalab.com

Twitter - @literalab

 

Literary roundup: Imre Kertész’s retirement, Hermann Ungar makes Top 10 and Tolstoy’s head

On the retirement announcement of the great Hungarian writer, a Best of 2012 list that includes a book by Prague (or Czech) German writer Hermann Ungar and a new monument of Tolstoy in Washington D.C. that is not included in the above photos because I didn’t find a photo of it.

Continue Reading


Bananas for Anna, or the Karenins are about to split
Hello, I’m about to throw myself in front of a train. Before I do, would you like to consider dressing like me, because I am elegant, though all that elegance is like just so much unsatisfying tinsel. Actually it’s diamonds and such for me. It’s really only tinsel for you fools who buy the imitation stuff from Banana Republic.
Don’t know what I’m talking about - click the link - Anna

Bananas for Anna, or the Karenins are about to split

Hello, I’m about to throw myself in front of a train. Before I do, would you like to consider dressing like me, because I am elegant, though all that elegance is like just so much unsatisfying tinsel. Actually it’s diamonds and such for me. It’s really only tinsel for you fools who buy the imitation stuff from Banana Republic.

Don’t know what I’m talking about - click the link - Anna

Reading Russia: yesterday and today, true and false
At Russia Beyond the Headlines novelist Zakhar Prilepin has written a broadside against the neglect of contemporary Russian literature, ongoing simplifications of Russia he sees coming from the West, and makes a case for a non-parodic, traditional, conservative form of Russian writing as it existed in the time of Tolstoy and Chekhov.
Continue Reading
Brilliant illustration for the article by Natalia Mikhaylenko, more of whose work can be seen here.

Reading Russia: yesterday and today, true and false

At Russia Beyond the Headlines novelist Zakhar Prilepin has written a broadside against the neglect of contemporary Russian literature, ongoing simplifications of Russia he sees coming from the West, and makes a case for a non-parodic, traditional, conservative form of Russian writing as it existed in the time of Tolstoy and Chekhov.

Continue Reading

Brilliant illustration for the article by Natalia Mikhaylenko, more of whose work can be seen here.

Literary roundup: The apartment of Russia’s King Lear and Tolstoy the outrageous
On the apartment (and life and death) of the great Russian/Jewish/Yiddish/Soviet actor Solomon Mikhoels, a Russian Bullet in The American Readerand Tolstoy, Tolstoy and - you guessed it - Tolstoy.
Continue Reading

Literary roundup: The apartment of Russia’s King Lear and Tolstoy the outrageous

On the apartment (and life and death) of the great Russian/Jewish/Yiddish/Soviet actor Solomon Mikhoels, a Russian Bullet in The American Readerand Tolstoy, Tolstoy and - you guessed it - Tolstoy.

Continue Reading

The usefulness of Russian literature
Tolstoy for doctors, Dostoevsky for political scientists …
Continue Reading

The usefulness of Russian literature

Tolstoy for doctors, Dostoevsky for political scientists …

Continue Reading

Literary roundup:
On the absence of Russian writers on this year’s Best Translated Book Award, the latest issue of Bookforum, and how doctors look to Tolstoy in coping with death (probably a better idea than looking to Gogol or Dostoevsky).
Continue Reading

Literary roundup:

On the absence of Russian writers on this year’s Best Translated Book Award, the latest issue of Bookforum, and how doctors look to Tolstoy in coping with death (probably a better idea than looking to Gogol or Dostoevsky).

Continue Reading

Tolstoy: How Much Land Does a Man Need

Tolstoy

A review of the new translation of Tolstoy’s How Much Land Does a Man Need published by Calypso Editions. Finally, a translator that doesn’t think he can “improve” Tolstoy and lets his story come across in the style it was intended to.

photo - Calypso Editions

Calypso publishes Tolstoy, Polish and Romanian poetry

Calypso Editions is a new artist-run, cooperative press that showed its uniqueness right from the start, launching with a new translation of Tolstoy’s classic yet lesser known novella How Much Land Does a Man Need in December 2010. A collection of a Polish poet’s work about the Warsaw Uprising will be followed by an anthology of Romanian poetry. Check them out.

The shadows of Central Europe

The Conspirators by Michael Andre Bernstein shows another side of the Central European literary heritage, that of the region as a setting and a subject, maybe even, with its cafe conspirators, religious fanatics and haunted self-made men, as a whole genre in itself.