Central European literary life

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Literary roundup: Readux Series 2 launch, Marian Schwartz
On the latest Anna Karenina, difficult Russian translations, the next Russian work that will be in B O D Y and a vodka and Green Egg and Ham-fueled book launch in Berlin.
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Literary roundup: Readux Series 2 launch, Marian Schwartz

On the latest Anna Karenina, difficult Russian translations, the next Russian work that will be in B O D Y and a vodka and Green Egg and Ham-fueled book launch in Berlin.

Read more at Literalab

Literary roundup: 1960s Soviet Union finally opening up
On the Russian Secret Service’s release of the manuscript + typescript of Vasily Grossman’s (pictured) epic novel Life and Fate as well as a translator’s explanation of changing a book’s title and a Dostoevsky walk through St. Petersburg with a William T. Vollmann anecdote from my own Dostoevsky walk.
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Literary roundup: 1960s Soviet Union finally opening up

On the Russian Secret Service’s release of the manuscript + typescript of Vasily Grossman’s (pictured) epic novel Life and Fate as well as a translator’s explanation of changing a book’s title and a Dostoevsky walk through St. Petersburg with a William T. Vollmann anecdote from my own Dostoevsky walk.

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Literary roundup: Found in Translation Award and falling in love with literary Russia


Antonia Lloyd-Jones has been awarded the 2012 Found in Translation Award as the best Polish translator and  there’s a new anthology of contemporary Russian poetry.

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Photos - Two of the seven books Lloyd-Jonestranslated from Polish in 2012

Teffi in B O D Y
"Merangov interspersed his stories with various local words and expressions, which made them very colorful, although for us who did not know those barbarian languages they all sounded alike, something like ‘be-me-ne’ or ‘El-Dzhaman’."
From a story by Nadezhda Lokhvitskaya, who wrote under the name Teffi, first in St. Petersburg and after the 1919 Revolution in Paris.
Read the story in B O D Y’s Sunday European Fiction
Photo - Teffi in World War I

Teffi in B O D Y

"Merangov interspersed his stories with various local words and expressions, which made them very colorful, although for us who did not know those barbarian languages they all sounded alike, something like ‘be-me-ne’ or ‘El-Dzhaman’."

From a story by Nadezhda Lokhvitskaya, who wrote under the name Teffi, first in St. Petersburg and after the 1919 Revolution in Paris.

Read the story in B O D Y’s Sunday European Fiction

Photo - Teffi in World War I

The Soviet Pushkin centenary celebrations in 1937 at the height of Stalin’s Terror

The Soviet Pushkin centenary celebrations in 1937 at the height of Stalin’s Terror

Literary roundup: Pushkin and Russian bombs
Russian writer Mikhail Shishkin on how the Russian state uses  Russian literature and Pushkin in particular to legitimize itself but that Putin’s increasingly authoritarian state might not need him, being so heavily reliant on the idiot box.
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Literary roundup: Pushkin and Russian bombs

Russian writer Mikhail Shishkin on how the Russian state uses Russian literature and Pushkin in particular to legitimize itself but that Putin’s increasingly authoritarian state might not need him, being so heavily reliant on the idiot box.

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Literary roundup: Anxious, dark and scary
László Krasznahorkai getting anxious in The New York Times, a host of Russian horror and the first of a series of Russian stories read out loud.
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Photo - Spanish poster for Mario Bava’s Black Sabbath, one part of which is based on the 19th century vampire novel Vurdulak by Alexei Tolstoy (though he wrote it in French).

Literary roundup: Anxious, dark and scary

László Krasznahorkai getting anxious in The New York Times, a host of Russian horror and the first of a series of Russian stories read out loud.

Continue Reading

Photo - Spanish poster for Mario Bava’s Black Sabbath, one part of which is based on the 19th century vampire novel Vurdulak by Alexei Tolstoy (though he wrote it in French).

The End is Nigh (actually not)
Russian writers on what to do on the last day of human existence (though it turns out the world didn’t end) and pictures of a post-apocalyptic Moscow (see pictured).
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The End is Nigh (actually not)

Russian writers on what to do on the last day of human existence (though it turns out the world didn’t end) and pictures of a post-apocalyptic Moscow (see pictured).

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Literary roundup: Dueling Mandelstam reviews and German writers in fashion
On a pair of opposing reviews of a new Mandelstam translation and a review of Joseph Roth’s letters that brings up some other German-language writers and their potential revivals.
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Photo - Klaus Mann

Literary roundup: Dueling Mandelstam reviews and German writers in fashion

On a pair of opposing reviews of a new Mandelstam translation and a review of Joseph Roth’s letters that brings up some other German-language writers and their potential revivals.

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Photo - Klaus Mann

Literary roundup: The first Prague expat poet and Pushkin’s Pushkin
On Elizabeth Jane Weston - “Westonia”  - pictured above with her stepfather alchemist Edward Kelley in the Facebook game Assassin’s Creed: Project Legacy, who was an English poet in Prague at the time of Shakespeare (and much more famous than him back then). Also an interview with Pushkin Press and 10 Russian books on film.
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Literary roundup: The first Prague expat poet and Pushkin’s Pushkin

On Elizabeth Jane Weston - “Westonia”  - pictured above with her stepfather alchemist Edward Kelley in the Facebook game Assassin’s Creed: Project Legacy, who was an English poet in Prague at the time of Shakespeare (and much more famous than him back then). Also an interview with Pushkin Press and 10 Russian books on film.

Continue Reading