Central European literary life

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Literary roundup: Reliving the 1930s
On the right-wing Hungarian government’s tightening controls, including on the country’s cultural life, and a profile of the eccentric (to say the least) Hungarian interwar pulp fiction writer Jenő Rejtő, who opened his novels like this:
"Ivan Gorchev, sailor on the freight ship ‘Rangoon’, was not yet twenty-one when he won the Nobel Prize in physics. To win a scientific award at such a romantically young age is unprecedented, though some people might consider the means by which it was achieved a flaw. For Ivan Gorchev won the Nobel Prize in physics in a card game, called macao, from a Professor Bertinus, on whom the honour had been bestowed in Stockholm by the King of Sweden a few days earlier. But those who are always finding fault don’t like to face facts, and the fact of the matter is that Ivan Gorchev did win the Nobel Prize at the age of twenty-one."
- from The 14-Carat Roadster
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Literary roundup: Reliving the 1930s

On the right-wing Hungarian government’s tightening controls, including on the country’s cultural life, and a profile of the eccentric (to say the least) Hungarian interwar pulp fiction writer Jenő Rejtő, who opened his novels like this:

"Ivan Gorchev, sailor on the freight ship ‘Rangoon’, was not yet twenty-one when he won the Nobel Prize in physics. To win a scientific award at such a romantically young age is unprecedented, though some people might consider the means by which it was achieved a flaw. For Ivan Gorchev won the Nobel Prize in physics in a card game, called macao, from a Professor Bertinus, on whom the honour had been bestowed in Stockholm by the King of Sweden a few days earlier. But those who are always finding fault don’t like to face facts, and the fact of the matter is that Ivan Gorchev did win the Nobel Prize at the age of twenty-one."

- from The 14-Carat Roadster

Continue Reading

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